Chenin Boutwell – Orange County

18 01 2008

Chenin Boutwell describes photography as her “perfect career” and if you read her interview and visit her website you can see just how passionate she is about her work both in her words & images. Chenin is one of these people that you warm to immediately and would love to meet in person! She’s had a busy year with setting up a new studio, re-branding herself, launching Totally Rad Actions with Doug and an Anti-workshop so we’re more than grateful to her for putting together an interview for DBUI and sharing her work with us.

And if you’re wondering, Chenin Boutwell really is delightful!

Chenin’s Website
Chenin’s Blog
Totally Rad Actions
Anti-Workshop

How long have you been a photographer?

I’ve been shooting for about 5 or 6 years now. I’ve shot weddings that entire time!

When you graduated from law school, why did you decide to take up photography instead of following a career in law? Any regrets?!

I shot weddings all through law school. During my second year in law school, I attended WPPI and the DWF Convention – it was life-changing. I met all sorts of people who were making a living at shooting weddings and being a lawyer was sounding less and less appealing. I came home from Vegas to a message on my answering machine. It was the Public Defender’s office and they had a job for me that, two weeks before, was my dream job. I felt physically ill at the thought of working as a lawyer and I knew I would never be happy if I quit photography and took up lawyering. I promptly announced to my parents and family that I was going to finish law school, but I wasn’t going to be a lawyer. I have not regretted it for one day!

Especially during the busy wedding season, how do you keep yourself motivated & your photography fresh?

This is so hard! I get a little stale sometimes, but I remind myself that it beats the hell out of spending my days chatting with clients in their jail cells! In all seriousness, I like to give myself little challenges. If I’m feeling a bit stale, I will challenge myself to make an awesome shot of the bride with her dad, or a really cool image of the bridal party. Or sometimes, if there’s a print competition I want to participate it, I will strive to make one image that is worthy of entering. I think, in photography, like in life, you have to challenge yourself every day, or it gets really boring really fast.

What (or who) has inspired, & continues to inspire, your work?

I love all kinds of photography, so I tend to pour over images everywhere I go. I stare intently at billboards, I study magazines, I analyze the way my favorite movies and tv shows are shot. I am inspired, in one way or another, by every image that I see. But was really inspires me is how some people approach life and business. It’s no secret that John and Dalisa Cooper are my best friends in the world. That’s because they are committed to living life to its fullest and are fearless when it comes to photography and business. I am inspired by the folks who attend The Anti-Workshops (affectionately referred to as, The Anti-Crew), because they have proven that, if we help one another, we can all improve our images, our businesses and our spirits.

Do you have a catchphrase/buzz word to describe your studio and what prompted this choice?

Earlier this year, when I transitioned from being a husband-wife team to just being me, I decided to completely re-brand Boutwell Studio. I knew I wanted something that reflected my style and my personality – retro, full of life and a bit irreverent. I have always had a fascination with under-used or archaic words – words no one uses any more – and I’ve always loved the word “delightful.” It just makes me smile. So I decided, as part of my new brand, I would include the word. It’s been a great success and it’s so fun to try and incorporate it, subtly, in to everything I do.

This year, Doug, your husband, is concentrating more on different aspects of photography such as fashion. Is this a route you plan to take eventually or is your “delightful wedding photography” here to stay?

I am here to stay! One of the things I love about wedding photography is that I get to shoot real, everyday people! The thought of shooting models, or shooting for an Art Director, just doesn’t appeal to me. Doug is a rule-breaker by nature and he disliked the rules and expectations that exist for wedding photographers. For me, the rules bug me sometimes, but I prefer to subtly and gradually subvert them 😉

Tell us one way you marketed your business when you first began and one way you market yourself now.

My strategy has been the same from Day One – be a kind person, with a reputation for excellent customer service, and make pretty pictures. If you have those two things, and make an effort to get yourself out there, you’ll do just fine! I attend lots of industry parties and mixers, make an effort to reach out to new people in the wedding world, and live by those two rules. Super simple.

What do you say or do to put your clients at ease in front of the camera?

I am a huge dork. I think that helps a lot. I chat with them, laugh with them, ask them about pets/family/jobs – anything to get them to forget that the camera is there. A lot of people comment that my work is very natural and that my subjects seem at ease; I think that is just a result of treating each client like a friend and creating a playful, easy-going atmosphere at every shoot.

You and your husband have put together one of the most talked about action sets amongst wedding photographers. What is it about Totally Rad actions that sets it apart from the rest?

I could talk about these for days! The set evolved out of our daily workflow. People started emailing and calling and asking questions about how we achieved certain looks in Photoshop, so we decided to make the actions available to other photographers. When we created them, we had never seen or used any other action sets (we’re very do-it-yourself!), which I think is a real asset. We created a set of tools that can be used at different strengths, that can be combined, that can be customized by each photographer to create their own “look” – the Totally Rad Actions aren’t your typical “throw a filter on it and call it a day” actions, they are a tool designed to help each photographer bring his/her images to fruition.
They are also damn fast for workflow! I shoot and process roughly 45 weddings and 25 portraits a year, do all my own retouching and free-hand design albums for every shoot. I could not do it without the TRA!

What action in the set do you use most?

I love Boutwell Magic Glasses – I think it’s so much better than simply sharpening and adding contrast to your images. I also love the Black and White Actions – I feel like my black and whites have really improved with the actions.

Can you show us some recent before and after images using this set and tell us which actions were used?

You, Doug, John and Dalisa Cooper run the Anti-Workshop. If someone were deciding which workshop to attend, why should they consider the anti-workshop?

Let me first say that The Anti-Workshop is not for everyone. It’s for photographers who know how to use their gear and know how to run a business, but are just looking for that extra little sparkle in life, photography and business. The Anti-Workshop is very intensive and we ask photographers to really step outside of their comfort zone; we ask them to push their work, to toss away any judgment of others and themselves, and to give 1000% for 3 days. It’s so incredibly rewarding to see people experiment and play and make friends. I am really proud to say that we have formed a little family – the Coopers, the Boutwells, and The Anti-Crew – and that everyone, including myself, has really improved their lives and their art. It also helps to have a healthy tolerance for alcohol and punk music.

Do you take time out to photograph for yourself? If so, what kind of things do you tend to shoot?

I wish I had time…. This year has been a tough transition and has left very little time for any personal work. I think, honestly, teaching is what I do for myself. I get so much from teaching The Anti-Workshop, and from those little opportunities to meet/help/learn from other photographers.

What advice do you have for photographers just starting out?

Be true to yourself! If you are truly genuine, decisions about what to shoot, how to shoot, how to brand and market yourself – all of it – becomes so easy. Plus, it sucks to be constantly trying to be someone else. I have a saying that I use almost daily – “whatever package you come in, put a bow on it!”

What advice do you have for photographers who have been in the industry for a while now?

I would tell more seasoned photographers to toss aside their feelings of entitlement, competitiveness and complacency and to step it up. There are new and better photographers coming in to the market every day and they will put us out of business if we don’t learn to share with them, connect with them and be challenged by them. A rising tide raises all ships….

Have you made any new year’s resolutions for your business? in your personal life?

Have more fun. Recycle more. Spend more time with the people I love.

Which photographer would you like to shoot with for a day & why?

Ooooh…. so hard. Probably David LaChapelle – I love his color, his intensity and I have a feeling it would be a party.

Here are some of Chenin’s favorite images from 2007:

And finally we asked Chenin to show us a set of images from one of her personal favorite weddings of last year:

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Amorphia Photography – UK / Europe

2 11 2007

Mark Eric has asked me a couple of times now to put an interview together for Don’t Box Us In and I guess I’ve been putting it off as it seemed a little weird posting here after having been helping out on the site! Anyway, I thought Mark would probably just keep on asking so here it is!

For those of you that don’t know, Amorphia Photography is made up of me, Sofie, and my husband, Paul. He’s the technical half of the collaboration and I’m the creative & literary part so I get to fill out the interview!!

Amorphia Photography Website
Amorphia Photography Blog

How do you keep yourself motivated & your photography fresh?

I bought my first camera, a Nikon F50 with a tin can Nikkor lens, and it seemed as though I’d been going through life without really seeing what was around me. I obviously wasn’t walking around blindfolded but picking up a camera made me change HOW I saw everything and how those things might work in an image. Ten years on and that intensity and capacity for truly “seeing” hasn’t dwindled & I think part of the reason for that is that photography is a huge chunk of my life and more importantly I shoot for myself as much as I do for my clients. I don’t just pick up a camera when I have work but if it is a job, I want the images to be special, not just run of the mill shots or the same photos I took with the last set of clients. Second-rate, average shots just don’t cut it for me. As much as my clients might love a mediocre image, I’m personally not satisfied with providing them with average work so that in itself is motivation enough to keep me on my toes. It’s also about breaking rules (as great as the rule of thirds might be every once in a while it’s begging to be broken) and setting myself challenges. Then again, it could be as simple as the fact that I still enjoy taking photographs!

I think being around others who share the same interest and passion as you do also has a tendency to rub off. I joined the Open Source Photo forum in March this year and it’s been a great source of information and encouragement so thank you to everyone who’s shared a part in that for me.

What (or who) has inspired, & continues to inspire, your work?

When I first started out as a wedding photographer a couple of years ago, I suddenly “found” all these superstar photographers’ blogs & websites online and I was in complete awe (I still am at times!) but to the point where it would frustrate me everytime I viewed their work. I wanted to be as good as them and I wanted to be that good NOW. I eventually realised, there’s a very fine line between inspiration and the pressure of wanting to emulate another photographer. Once I accepted that, I could actually move on and work on my own photography. I still admire so many people’s work though and I could probably fill a couple of A4 sheets with names if you really wanted me to!

One group of photographers that still inspire me is the company I used to work for as an art director which is called Venture. As much as British pro photographers love to hate it, it taught me so much about contemporary portraiture and completely pushing the boundaries when it comes to portrait photography. I actually miss working there for the plain fact that it was truly amazing seeing what people I worked with would come up with just when you honestly thought that was as far as you could go. Their yearly image collection is a great example of photographers not being boxed in by traditional concepts.

What do you say or do to put your clients at ease in front of the camera?

This starts way before I’ve even picked up a camera. It’s all about getting your clients to trust you and feel relaxed in your presence so once you do have that camera in your hands they are already comfortable around you. I find that some people just need that little bit of extra reassurance whilst they’re in front of the camera that what they’re doing is right or that they look good so I’ll happily give it to them and encourage them. I also tend to do a few fun & relaxed shots very early on in the shoot to make them forget the camera’s pointed in their direction. Those “fun” shots involve movement and interaction either with each other if it’s a couple, or with me & the camera if it’s a single person, rather than getting the client in a still position & posing which most people find awkward especially at the start of a shoot. I also think it’s important to get yourself in front of the camera every so often so you remember what it’s like being there yourself so you can understand your client and how they might be feeling!

How important is post-processing in your final images?

Some might actually say I post-process to a fault! For me post-processing is not about “fixing” an image but rather it’s about enhancing an already strong image. If an image is poorly composed or exposed, no amount of post-processing will redeem the photograph. I mainly use duplicate layers, blending modes, masks & curves and Photoshop’s new Smart Sharpen tool to bring out colors, textures and details which is what I did with this image below:

Image 1 (straight out of camera)

Image 2 (after 5 minutes in PS!)

If you weren’t a photographer, what would you have been?

I wanted to be a fashion designer but it didn’t help that I coudn’t draw to save my life! Picking up a camera and being able to produce art in a photographic format was my way of expressing my non-drawing, non-painting, frustrated creative side so I actually can’t see myself being anything but a photographer now!

It’s coming up to 2008, do you have any resolutions for the new year with regards to business? Or personal?

We’re moving back to Cyprus early next year, so it’ll be a fresh market for us and we’ll be starting our business from scratch again but, as it’s a relatively small place, by the time the year is out I’d like to be well established on the island as the most contemporary wedding or portrait photographer to hire! Kind of a big one, huh?

On a more personal note, I resolve to sit up straight at the computer and get to yoga classes more regularly!

What advice do you have for other photographers?

Don’t become complacent about your work. There’s always room for improvement, change & progression.

If you were planning on having a photo-shoot, who would you want to photograph your portrait & why?

Herb Ritts, but sadly he’s dead so I’ll settle for getting re-married (before I get into trouble, to Paul again obviously!) and asking Joe Buissink to cut me a deal on his prices 😉





Part Three – Mike Fulton, TriCoast Photography – Houston/Worldwide

31 08 2007

So here it is, the final part of Mike Fulton’s excellent & generous contribution to Don’t Box Us In. We’ve made everyone wait, Mike included, until this third post to let everyone in on Mike’s big secret….

If you’ve been to WPPI you will have heard of the Champagne Shootout. It’s a great experience to watch but, even more amazing, is to be selected to be one of the four photographers to take part and Mike is one of the four professional photographers invited to be a part of WPPI 2008’s Champagne Shootout! It’s a well-deserved honor for Mike to be taking part in this and very encouraging to see him being recognized by his peers. Congratulations to Mike & TriCoast Photography!

For those of you that haven’t heard of this before, it consists of four professional photographers, four shooting tracks with live posing & photographing, four big screens and four distinct points of view. It’s sponsored by Miller’s Lab & not only is it educational but a huge amount of fun. Here’s what Mike has to say about it:

“We (TriCoast) plan on having some surprises (free surprises I might add) for everyone that comes over and checks us out. Billed with my name on it, but truly a complete TriCoast event, both myself and Cody will be on stage, mic’ed up, shooting some studio images at first, but then really breaking out into what we do best, our wireless flash photography. Wedding photography is fun and exciting but limited many times to horrible hours of the day to capture the must needed images. Studio lighting simply won’t cut it many times due to this nature so we plan on going back to the basics! We want to show everyone how Cody and I work together as a team, something I feel is very rare in today’s photography business. How we each have our strong points and each have our weak points but we work together to make one decent photographer. How we use the ETTL wireless flash system anywhere anytime both inside and outside but are not afraid to throw on a Pocket Wizard and other goodies to make sure the image we want or need is captured. Capturing the image live right in front of the crowd, then not only showing you the image but also telling you the camera settings, focal length and ISO, EVERYTHING. Open for questions during the two hour program from the crowd, we want it to be very informative and very fun learning experience for all involved, ourselves included! So I hope to see some friendly faces this coming year out at WPPI for the Champagne Shootout, I promise it will be fun!”

Mike is also speaking at other events such as the Miller’s Lab booth and the Collages.net booth on the showroom floor so make sure to catch up with him during WPPI ’08!

Part three showcases Mike’s mastery at post-processing as shown in his before and after images below. TriCoast Photography have shared their post-processing techniques through a range of actions that can be found at Finding Color

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This last set of images is hot off the press! Mike tells us “the first one is SOOC (straight out of the camera) – How the image was actually shot. I knew when I saw this location I wanted to place the bride where I did and process it how the final product is before I clicked the shutter. This is one reason why I love my actions, I know their limits and tones and it helps me “see” the image so much clearer while shooting.

The next has my Finding Color Alstott Orange and Deep Sand actions applied to the image, giving it the dark – rich tones with the red/orange feel, after using the blend modes to blend the tones into the orig. image. Finally I blended the background with the image, place a sloppy border around it and added basic text and contact information to it for one of our new national ads. I feel “Less is More” and the image should speak for itself if not your client will find an image that does.”

Mike Fulton

Mike Fulton

Mike Fulton

Mike is truly an inspiration to photographers in many respects & we hope you’ve learnt from & enjoyed this feature as much as we have. Thank you once again Mike and we look forward to seeing you in action at the Champagne Shootout!





Part One: Mike Fulton, TriCoast Photography – Houston/Worldwide

25 08 2007

If you’ve never met Mike Fulton face to face or had the pleasure of bumping into him on a photography forum, there are definitely a few things you should know about him. Mike is one of the principal photographers of TriCoast Photography but he’s not just any photographer – he’s one of the most accomplished, talented & highly regarded photographers in our field.

He’s also one of those special people that doesn’t do anything by halves and we’re very pleased to be able to feature Mike, not just as a photographer, but as a very generous, friendly and gracious person. When we asked him if we could feature him on Don’t Box Us In, little did we realize we would get such a prompt reply with one of the most in depth & informative contributions we’ve had so far.

Mike uses a wonderful phrase on a regular basis… NO SECRETS. He told us this is the key to his beliefs and the backbone of TriCoast Photography. All you need to do is ask him about a particular subject and if he can help he’ll gladly do so. To quote him from a recent email, he says, “Have I been burned by this? Sure I have, many times, but I have also learned & experienced many amazing things, all of which outweigh the negative aspects. You get out of life what you put into life, surrounding yourself with negative people only keeps you from growing. I truly feel by sharing information and learning from everyone involved, the business of photography will be much better in the long run. There are 1000’s of weddings in the United States alone every weekend, we can only shoot one!!” Mike is a man true to his word and you’ll find there are “No Secrets” in his interview or the images he provided us with.

TriCoast Photography’s other principal photographer is Cody Clinton and together, he & Mike, have become world reknowned editorial fashion wedding photographers with a very different approach to their work. They have photographed events in United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, Czech Republic, Mexico, as well as other countries, and their work has been seen in such notable magazines such as Rangefinder, Professional Photographer, Shutterbug and Studio Photography.

Mike Fulton and Cody Clinton, TriCoast Photography

Mike started in the high fashion and glamour field and soon found his work being published in many publications ranging from art magazines to calendars. He finally found his true passion in the art of wedding photography. Bringing his love for fashion and glamour styles with him, Mike uses his knowledge and artistic eye to blend these Editorial Fashion styles with the beauty of the wedding day. Mike is an instructor for Photography Allstars, a high quality one on one mentoring website as well as one of the instructors on his own workshop which specializes in wireless flash and video light techniques and has a very successful products line, Finding Color which enhance the daily lives of the normal photographers. TriCoast also just recently had the honor of being the only wedding photographers in the United States to be included in a new educational book called Mastering Digital Wedding Photography by James Carney which is now being sold at Amazon.com and many other online and storefront bookstores.

With all the information Mike kindly provided us, we found it impossible to whittle it all down so we’re dividing it into three sections and sharing everything with Don’t Box Us In’s readers as we’re sure you’ll find it as educational as we did. In this first part, we’ll feature Mike’s interview below & some of TriCoast Photography’s images and, in a few days time, part two will consist of some interesting behind the scenes images of TriCoast’s lighting set-ups & in the final part we’ll showcase some of TriCoast’s before and after images, for which they are well known. We’d like to thank Mike for sharing his extensive knowledge & images and for taking the time to put this information together for us.

How do you keep yourself motivated & your photography fresh?
For us, TriCoast, the key to keep ourselves motivated and unique is to simply do what we want and feel is right. At every session we push ourselves to create something we have not done before. This can be as simple as a different flash angle or camera point of view or more outside the box using multi-wireless flash units or other techniques. While sometimes these experimental captures do not work we study them afterwards and keep shooting the basic idea until we get what we want. Many of the TriCoast standard shots we capture in our sessions today started off by this method. Also since we already capture the needed shots during our session, our clients will never know we are experimenting while shooting their session.

What (or who) has inspired, & continues to inspire, your work?
Honestly I do not get inspired by looking at wedding photography, I shoot this subject every week and I simply do not want to look at things that I work in. Inspirations come to me by so many places, for photography it would be fashion work, especially since that is one area I started out in many years ago in the studio. Nature is a big one for me be it fishing, hiking, camping or just sitting in my backyard. Several lost friends which I have met throughout my life, who had a passion for this amazing art form. Teaching and sharing with other photographers who truly care about the ethics and love for photography. However, my greatest inspiration is hands down my daughter, Meghan, who truly showed me what life was all about. Her smile and simple outlook on life always brings me back to just being a daddy which is what I truly love being.

What do you say or do to put your clients at ease in front of the camera?
Well I think TriCoast is unique, it’s a two man team 100% of the time. We each have our part of the business we excel in. For me it is post processing, business end of things, for Cody it is client relationships and building them. So normally Cody is the one that contacts the client, sets up the sessions, etc. So when our sessions start we have the clients always look at Cody as the “main” photographer. The clients already have a bond with Cody so it sets them at ease a little more to begin with. I usually roam in the background finding the off angle shots and checking out how the light falls on the subjects. As the session continues and the client relaxes we might switch off main and background shooter and we are always interacting with our clients with jokes or other aspects to make them relax and laugh. As one of us talks the other is always ready with the camera to capture the natural smiles and laughter which always makes the images stronger. Also I feel most of our clients are already at ease when we start the session by our personal connection we create with them. We turn away more clients than we accept and those who do work with us, simply “get” TriCoast so it makes the events go by much easier and more fun!

What advice do you have for other photographers?
Be true to yourself. Take advice from anyone but always be true to yourself and trust your “gut” feeling. Be ethical in this business, too many photographers are not, I can think of many right now as I type this, and they cut-throat other photographers to make a name for themselves. Finally learn light and shadows! In today’s age of digital photography we have so much more control over our final output giving us our unique style and look. However too many photographers simply do not understand light and how it works with shadows on our subjects. When working with people we need to have shadows in our work, without those shadows, our work is simply flat boring lighting. Due to this, it seems photographers love to take a snapshot of a client with horrible lighting then do a fancy processing to it, mostly cross processing now-days, and make it a decent image. Of course this will make money and is not a bad thing, but if you want to take your work to the next level learn how to apply light and shadows to your subject and then process those images with those fancy processing skills and you will find your work will truly stand out above the rest of the digital photographers in your area.

How important is the post-processing stage in your images? Please show us some before and after images.
As stated above I think post-processing is a very important stage in your work, especially in the wedding world where the lighting and subject you shoot is always changing. I feel in studio where lighting is more controlled one can shoot and show without much processing if one knows what they are doing. Of course there is nothing wrong with that method, but that is not the TriCoast way. We shoot with processing already in our minds. Many times I know how I want to process an image before I even click the shutter. I feel it is truly a “marriage” between how we shoot, the format we capture it in (RAW) and the processing which I apply afterwards.

Take this image below. A very traditional location, the Biltmore Hotel outside of Miami, Florida, which we wanted to capture some moments that did “not box us in”. So we shot it very underexposed to make sure all the whites were not blown out, which we can do by understanding how much we can bring up an underexposed image. This information allows us more freedom in shooting and gives us more options in processing. I simply brought up the exposure, upped the colors and a few other details. Now this image is one of the main images Miller’s Lab uses in their national print ads and other events.

TriCoast Photography

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The next “before and after” images below shows how we use the color which is already there to intensify the contrast which adds to the overall image. TriCoast LOVES color, even our Black and White and Sepia tones in our action set has colors mixed into the tones, which truly gives me complete control over our work. I feel when color is there embrace it and make the image stand out above all the others you see.

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Show us a photograph by another photographer that you would have liked to have taken & tell us why!

Image by Lithium Picnic, A.K.A. – Philip Warner
A Houston based photographer, super amazing person and one of the most amazing photographers I have ever seen in understanding light and more importantly shadows. While his work is very unique and border line on many sexual subjects one can not get away from his amazing understanding of this art form. Mixed in with his wife/model that is in this image as well as the incredible hair and makeup artists he works with, Philip truly understands how a simple portrait can truly take a life of its own when done correctly. Philip simply makes me jealous of his amazing talent, vision and art!

Below are a selection of TriCoast’s images…We’ll be posting more from Mike very soon PLUS we hope to be able to make a very exciting announcement about TriCoast Photography by the end of three posts!

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Website: TriCoast Photography
Blog: TriCoast Photography Blog
Seniors: TriCoast Seniors
Education: Photography All Stars
Products/Seminars: Finding Color